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Leumi's Community Activities

Six Stories-New Directions II

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Shira Gepstein-Moshkovich (Click to Enlarge)
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Anisa Ashkar (Click to Enlarge)
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Eitan Ben-Moshe (Click to Enlarge)
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Masha Zusman (Click to Enlarge)
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Yair Barak (Click to Enlarge)

The art exhibition "New Directions II," was a series of six, one person exhibitions from Ella Amitay Sadovsky, Anisa Ashkar, Eitan Ben-Moshe, Yair Barak, Shira Gepstein-Moshkovich and Masha Zusman. Works of these artists entered the Leumi collection during the past decade, and were exhibited alongside the one person exhibitions. 

 

Beit Mani, the Leumi Visitors' Center– one of the beautiful buildings preserved from Tel Aviv's early years, is dedicated to exhibiting Israeli art. This is the second time that Leumi exhibited its collection at Beit Mani, the Leumi Visitors' Center, inviting the public to follow stages in the development of these artists' work since they entered the collection

 

Anisa Ashkar's “Tribute to Van Gogh", 2005, from the Leumi collection, is a self-portrait of multi-layered meaning. With a giant sunflower and a calligraphic drawing on her face, Ashkar has created visual cultural mediation. In her new works with coffee, cotton, and tar, she continues to explore the relationships between different cultural symbols.

 

Ella Amitay Sadovsky’s “Juda’s Hut” (2007) from the Leumi collection is a forerunner of her recent works. Some, such as "Perfect Moment", are characterized by theatricality, richness, colorfulness and a sense of motion. Along with her paintings, she presents – for the first time – a stop motion film (an animation technique that simulates motion in an inanimate object). Amitay Sadovsky received the Ministry of Culture Award for Art in 2012.

 

Yair Barak's "Real Estate" (2008-2010) from the Leumi collection addresses the gap between an image of happiness – an American suburb– and the feeling of evil lurking over it. In his new works from the "Modern Flare" series, Barak presents icons of Modern architecture, expressing the ambivalence between its seeming simplicity of style and its elusiveness.

Both Barak and Amitay Sadovsky received a Ministry of Culture award for Art in 2012.

 

Shira Gepstein-Moshkovich's painting has changed significantly since her expressive painting from 2009, "Bath", entered the Leumi collection. In this exhibition she is exhibiting sculpture as well. A wooden boat brings to mind a chain of associations, from Egyptian boats to the World to come, to models of ships that were popular as metaphors of power during the Imperial era.

 

Eitan Ben-Moshe, who received the Ministry of Culture Award in 2011, presents a sculpture composed from materials that seem to have been frozen after a drastic change in their state of matter. Two of his painting entered the Leumi collection in 2009, and present a different stage of his work.

 

Zusman’s flowers convey both a yearning for nature’s primeval beauty and a consciousness of the manner in which it becomes preciously rare. Her work from 2011 “untitled”, another recent acquisition of the collection, is beautiful and brittle, painted and drawn on laminated wood layers threatening to break up. In the new works paintings of flowers in orange red hover over a black graphite background like jewelry on velvet.

 

Curator: Dr. Smadar Sheffi

 

The exhibition was held between the dates of: January 1, 2013 and May 30, 2013, at the Beit Mani, Leumi Visitors' Center.

 

Beit Mani, the Leumi Visitors' Center

36 Yehuda Halevy Street

Tel Aviv, 

Telephone: 03-5149492

 

The public was invited to attend.  

Entrance was free of charge.